Spending like Steinbrenners

I’m glad to see my beloved New York Yankees are spending like the Yankees again, this week marking $155 million over seven years (plus a $20 million “posting fee,” whatever that is) to a pitcher who’s never played an MLB game. With big off-season money spent on All-Stars Brian McCann and Jacoby Ellsbury, this is starting to feel like home. Seems as though their biggest star, however, will be making the same amount of money playing baseball this year that I will: zero. Great as A-rod is (or was)… I don’t mind a nickel.

Set to be Super

After a great day of football yesterday, the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks have their tickets punched for Super Bowl XLVIII. in most sports a Denver/Seattle championship would have TV execs in tears–not exactly the nation’s biggest markets–but the Super Bowl isn’t really about pulling for the home team. This year’s “big game” (as it’s called in places that can’t advertise it) should have fans and studio heads cheering. A classic youth versus experience matchup in Wilson/Manning and the first outdoor game in years? This one is set to be Super.

White Collar really bringing it this season

USA’s White Collar has been particularly good this season, and last night’s episode continued an intriguing subplot begun before its holiday hiatus. With only two more episodes left this season, I am pleased with what I have seen and expect nothing less as the season closes. If you haven’t gotten into White Collar, do yourself a favor and get yourself caught up to speed. All the cool kids are doing it.

Baseball Hall of Fame Vote: No surprises

No surprises.

That was my reaction when reading the vote total of every single former major leaguer on the Baseball Hall of Fame ballot. I know it’s easy to say now, but I assure you each player was within a percentage point or two of where I thought he would be. Maddux, Glavine, and Frank Thomas were all well-deserved locks. No surprises. Steriod-plagued candidates such as Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds? Not even close. No surprises. The fact that Craig Biggio was close but didn’t quite make it? No surprise. Biggio’s a Hall of Famer for sure. He’s just not a first ballot Hall of Famer. Sound strange? Well, that’s just how the Hall of Fame operates. No surprises.

Rodman reaches new low

Dennis Rodman, though a legendary basketball player, has always been a bit on the unusual side. These days, his friendship with North Korea’s murdering thug leader has brought him to a new low. How he convinced a group of former NBA stars to join him on a “basketball diplomacy” sojourn to that God-forsaken country I will never know. I suppose they are all free to do what they want. I just urge them caution. After all, that roster of players is a who’s who of my childhood heroes.

Coleman was a true hero

Baseball lost one of its great men Sunday when Jerry Coleman passed away at age 89. Coleman was a player, manager, announcer, and combat pilot who saw action in both World War II and Korea. This quote from Bug Selig says it all: Jerry Coleman was a hero and a role model to myself and countless others in the game of Baseball. He had a memorable, multifaceted career in the National Pastime — as an All-Star during the great Yankees’ dynasty from 1949-1953, a manager and, for more than a half-century, a beloved broadcaster, including as an exemplary ambassador for the San Diego Padres. But above all, Jerry’s decorated service to our country in both World War II and Korea made him an integral part of the Greatest Generation.

Full obituary here: http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article/nyy/san-diego-padres-announcer-jerry-coleman-dies-at-89?ymd=20140105&content_id=66332642&vkey=news_nyy.